Working Paper Series http://journals.ub.uni-magdeburg.de/ubjournals/index.php/FEMM-WPS <p>herausgegeben vom Dekan<br>Fakultät für Wirtschaftswissenschaft</p> Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Fakultät für Wirtschaftswissenschaft de-DE Working Paper Series 1615-4274 Data-Driven Planning of Reliable Itineraries in Multi-Modal Transit Networks http://journals.ub.uni-magdeburg.de/ubjournals/index.php/FEMM-WPS/article/view/556 <p>Multi-modal travel itineraries are based on traversing multiple legs using more than one mode of transportation. The more combinations of legs and modes, the more challenging it is for a traveler to identify a reliable itinerary. Transportation providers collect data that can increase transparency for reliable travel planning. However, this data has not been fully exploited yet, although it will likely form an important piece of future traveler information systems. Our paper takes an important step in this direction by analyzing and aggregating data from the operation of scheduled and unscheduled modes to create a reliability measure for multi-modal travel. We use a network search algorithm to evaluate itineraries that combine schedule-based long-distance travel with airlines with last-mile and first-mile drive times to efficiently identify the one with the highest reliability given a start time and travel time budget. Our network search considers multiple origin and destination airports which impacts the first and last mile as well as the flight options. We use extensive historical datasets to create reliable itineraries and compare these with deterministic shortest travel time itineraries. We investigate the amount of data that is required to create reliable multi-modal travel itineraries. Additionally, we highlight the benefits and costs of reliable travel itineraries and analyze their structure.</p> Michael Redmond Ann Melissa Campbell Jan Fabian Ehmke ##submission.copyrightStatement## 2019-03-12 2019-03-12 10.24352/UB.OVGU-2019-081 Proprietary Parts as a Secondary Market Strategy http://journals.ub.uni-magdeburg.de/ubjournals/index.php/FEMM-WPS/article/view/555 <p>Introducing proprietary parts to gain a competitive edge is a well-known, yet poorly understood strategy original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) adopt. In this paper, we consider an OEM which sells new products and competes with an independent remanufacturer (IR) selling remanufactured products. The OEM considers using proprietary parts to manage the secondary market for remanufactured products. Thereby, the OEM designs its product to balance the trade-off between the cost of proprietariness and the extra income from selling the proprietary parts to the IR. We observe that the OEM always chooses the smallest possible proportion of proprietary parts. This allows it to control the secondary market<br>without the need to overly adjust the price charged for new products. Deterring market entry by the IR by pricing the proprietary parts prohibitively, an OEM strategy observed in several industries, is only optimal when the willingness-to-pay for remanufactured products is low. Otherwise, the OEM benefits more from sharing the secondary market profits with the IR through the use of proprietary parts. Finally, we nd that the OEM can also use proprietary parts to strategically deter entry by the IR and discourage it from collecting the cores. This can support the OEM's decision to engage in remanufacturing even in the case of a collection cost disadvantage. We show that - counterintuitively - the OEM may take up remanufacturing in situations where the IR would not. While the introduction of proprietary parts is detrimental to both IRs and consumers, OEM remanufacturing softens this loss for the consumers.</p> Rainer Kleber João Quariguasi Frota Neto Marc Reimann ##submission.copyrightStatement## 2019-02-08 2019-02-08 10.24352/UB.OVGU-2019-034